Treatments | Citrus Insider

Treatment Strategies Recommended by the University of California

Treatment strategies for the Asian citrus psyllid are different in various regions of the state depending on if the psyllid is well-established (requiring an area-wide management strategy) or is new to an area (requiring an eradication strategy).

Not all insecticides are effective against the psyllid. Some are short-lived, some only affect nymphal stages and some are quite toxic to natural enemies who feed on the psyllid. It’s important to consult the University of California’s guidelines for more information on approved and effective insecticides.

Eradication Strategy – San Joaquin Valley & Northern California

If the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) is new to an area, the University of California (UC) recommends an eradication strategy as the best approach to managing the psyllid. Citrus growers and pest control advisers in the San Joaquin Valley and Northern California should use the eradication strategy if ACP is found in or near a grove.

The UC recommends applying two ACP-effective insecticides with different modes of actions (systemic and foliar) as soon as possible after a detection of the psyllid. Treat the find site and neighboring orchards as close to the same time as possible, preferably within two weeks of each other. All blocks that intersect an 800-meter radius should be treated in their entirety. Blocks that are outside the 800 meters and are in the direction of prevailing winds should also be considered for treatment.

More details about eradication strategies and treatments can be found on the University of California’s website.


Area-Wide Management – Southern California & Coastal Regions

An area-wide management strategy applies to regions where the Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) has become established — like Southern California, Ventura County and Santa Barbara County — and aims to keep ACP populations as low as possible. Area-wide management is a strategy where growers in a specific area coordinate treatment schedules to maximize the impact on ACP populations, but in order to be effective, it is imperative neighboring growers work together.

Individual orchard treatments are not as effective once ACP has become established. Most insecticide residues break down in three to four weeks or less. If treatments occur in a patchwork fashion, ACP reinvade from neighboring areas when the residues break down. However, if treatments occur over a large area during a short period of time, they have the biggest impact on ACP.

In areas where there are established populations of ACP, area-wide management schedules are set on a county-by-county basis and are developed in partnership with the University of California, local ACP/HLB task forces and pest control districts. Contact your grower liaison with questions about area-wide management and how to implement the recommended protocols.

Even in regions that are not yet at this management stage, it is important to build the infrastructure of an area-wide management program so if the time comes to implement this strategy, growers in the region are ready. For more information about area-wide management, sign up to receive News & Updates, check our calendar to attend meetings in your area and talk to your grower liaison.


CDFA-Required Mitigation Steps for Movement of Bulk Citrus

To prevent the spread of the Asian citrus psyllid in California, an Asian citrus psyllid (ACP) regional quarantine for movement of bulk citrus is currently in effect. Various mitigation requirements are in place depending on the originating location of a bulk citrus shipment and its destination for packing. These mitigation requirements are mandatory by the California Department of Food and Agriculture and are outlined below.

All growers, packers/processers and haulers must have a signed 2018 exhibit form and compliance agreement with CDFA to ship bulk citrus in California. Establishments can verify their exhibits have been received by CDFA by checking the online database.

Required Mitigation Steps

Shipping to a Packer/Processor

Shipping From Within the Same ACP Bulk Citrus Regional Quarantine Zone or into Regional Quarantine Zone 6 In a Different ACP Bulk Citrus Regional Quarantine Zone (Not Zone 6)
ACP Regional Quarantine Zone 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7 Transport Completely Tarped or in a Fully Enclosed Vehicle Field Cleaned by Machine
or
Treatment Option
and
Transport Completely Tarped or in a Fully Enclosed Vehicle
and
Complete ACP-Free Declaration Form

Shipping to a Packer/Processor

Shipping From Within the Same Contiguous HLB Quarantine Area Outside of HLB Quarantine Area OR Different HLB Quarantine Area
HLB Quarantine Area Field Cleaned by Machine
or
Spray & Harvest
and
Transport Completely Tarped or in a Fully Enclosed Vehicle
and
Complete HLB Pest Risk Mitigation Form
Wet Wash
or
Field Cleaned by Machine and Spray & Harvest
and
Transport Completely Tarped or in a Fully Enclosed Vehicle
and
Complete HLB Pest Risk Mitigation Form